Diesel Fuel Pump

Diesel jumps 18 cents in two weeks

From Overdrive Online.

Diesel fuel prices across the U.S. have increased 18 cents in the last two weeks, with a 7.1-cent increase during the week ending Oct. 4 followed by a 10.9-cent increase during the week ending Oct. 11, according to the Department of Energy’s weekly report.

The U.S.’ average price for a gallon of on-highway diesel is now $3.586 – the highest point since the week ending Dec. 1, 2014, when prices were $3.605 per gallon. Steep recent rises are evident in the chart below showing average national prices.

Last week, the most significant increase was seen in the Central Atlantic region, where prices jumped by 13.3 cents, followed by the Gulf Coast region, where prices increased by 13.2 cents.

The nation’s most expensive diesel can be found in California at $4.425 per gallon, followed by the West Coast less California region at $3.784 per gallon.

The cheapest fuel can be found in the Gulf Coast region at $3.335 per gallon, followed by New England at $3.459 per gallon.

Prices in other regions, according to DOE, are:

Central Atlantic – $3.705
Lower Atlantic – $3.484
Midwest – $3.538
Rocky Mountain – $3.673

ProMiles’ numbers during the same week saw fuel prices increase by 8.9 cents, bringing its national average to $3.438 per gallon.

According to ProMiles’ Fuel Surcharge Index, the most expensive diesel can be found in California at $4.398 per gallon, and the cheapest can be found in the Gulf Coast region at $3.225 per gallon.

See the complete article online at Overdrive.